Education

Webinar Archive

Free online seminars related to wood design.

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Achieving the Imperative of High-Performance Multi-Family Housing with Wood Construction

A growing belief among design and construction professionals is that simply building to the energy code’s baseline minimums is no longer good enough. One approach that’s becoming increasingly popular for multi-family projects is passive house design. The Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA), which has funded 17 multi-family passive house projects, is propelling the affordable housing industry toward a net-zero energy standard by 2030. This initiative has proved a catalyst for the significant expansion of passive house/net-zero-capable housing, inspiring 14 more states to similarly incentivize passive house through their low-income housing tax credit programs. This webinar will share cost data, strategies, and lessons learned through completed passive house projects nationwide, demonstrating the radical, affordable, and scalable way the affordable housing industry is combatting climate change through improved energy performance. Timothy McDonald, RA, LEED AP, CPHC, CPHD, Onion Flats

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)[Download id not defined] CE Credit

Structural Mass Timber Design: The Engineers Role in Optimization

Achieving the highest level of cost efficiency possible with mass timber requires an understanding of both material properties and manufacturer capabilities. When it comes to laying out a structural grid, the square peg/round hole analogy is pertinent. Trying to force a mass timber solution on a grid laid out for steel or concrete can result in member size inefficiencies and the inability to leverage manufacturer capabilities. Knowing how to best lay out the grid—without sacrificing space functionality—allows the designer to optimize member sizes, but cost efficiency for a mass timber building goes beyond column spacing. This presentation will examine the structural engineer’s role in optimizing a mass timber structural layout by taking a systems vs. product approach. Topics will include known parameters for mass timber design, design challenges, connections, grid spacings, and lessons learned from the structural design of Colorado mass timber projects. Gregory R. Kingsley, PhD, PE, KL&A, Inc. Structural Engineers and Builders

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Mass Timber Connections: Building Structural Design Skills

For engineers new to mass timber design, connections can pose a particular challenge. This webinar focuses on connection design principles and analysis techniques unique to mass timber products such as cross-laminated timber, glued-laminated timber and nail-laminated timber. The session will focus on connection design options ranging from commodity fasteners and pre-engineered wood products to custom-designed solutions. Discussion will also include a review of timber mechanics and load transfer, as well as considerations such as tolerances, fabrication, durability, fire, and shrinkage that are relevant to structural design. Speaker: Bernhard Gafner, P.Eng, MIStructE, CEng, Dipl. Ing., ASPECT Structural Engineers

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Timber-Concrete Composite Floor Technology: Research, Design and Implementation

Timber-concrete composite floor technology is catching on in North America as a high-performance solution for long spans in commercial and industrial buildings. Comprised of timber beams or panels that are joined to a concrete slab by shear connectors, the resulting composite floor can be substantially stiffer and stronger than non-composite systems. This presentation will provide an overview of the evolution of shear connectors for these floor systems, discuss best practices and design guidelines for some commercially available connectors, and present a case study of the new Design Building at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, which features what is currently North America’s largest application of this technology Speaker: Peggi Clouston, PEng, MASc, PhD, University of Massachusetts

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Maximizing Mid-Rise Value with Wood: Design Tips for Podiums, Sloped Sites and Other Complexities

While more developers and design teams are choosing wood for four- to six-story buildings because of its cost efficiency, design complexities such as podiums, sloping sites, lot line proximities and basements add to the challenge of navigating code provisions. This presentation will explore those provisions with an emphasis on allowances that increase density while ensuring fire and life safety performance. Topics will include podiums and vertical offsets, sloping sites and how to determine number of stories, allowances for single and multi-level basements, high-rise provisions and when they’re applicable, fire walls, mezzanines, and more.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

The Evolution of Mid-Rise Design: Increasing Opportunities with Wood

The expanding use of wood-frame construction for mid-rise projects is allowing architects to creatively achieve multiple, simultaneous objectives. Wood can effectively meet code requirements while adding value and enabling the need for increased density in urban environments. Increasingly, wood buildings of five, six and more stories are rising up among traditional concrete and steel shells as designers and developers embrace timber’s vast potential for lower costs, faster installation, and a significantly lighter carbon footprint. Through the use of project examples, this session will illustrate trends in both residential and commercial mid-rise buildings. Topics will include current code allowances that offer opportunities for taller buildings, design strategies for improved building performance and code-compliant options for meeting fire and life safety requirements.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Design Considerations for Multi-Story Podium Projects

Updates to the International Building Code have created opportunities for designers and developers to add value to their mixed-use and multi-family projects by increasing potential scale and density. This presentation will introduce new code language that allows more than one story of above-ground podium with up to five stories of wood-frame construction above. Using built project examples, the discussion will include impacts on design, building layout, methods for dealing with height challenges and open space utilization.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Seattle Mass Timber Tower: Envisioning 12 Stories of Wood

Mass timber development has reached an inflection point in the United States. Until now, developers and designers of mass timber buildings have been comprised of groups referred to as early adopters. Now with the recently-approved IBC 2021 tall wood code changes as a basis of design, the momentum behind mass timber is transitioning from the curious and conversational to the cost-competitive and allowable. Building on that momentum, a team of industry leaders developed a design, engineering and cost feasibility study to serve as an example for the design of a 12-story mixed-use mass timber tower in Seattle. This presentation will explore that project, which utilized Type IV-B Construction and required 2-hour fire-resistant ratings for primary frame, bearing walls and floors. Standing 214 feet tall, the mixed-use program for this project includes street-level retail, five floors of commercial offices, and a 192-key hotel on the top six floors.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Now Approved: Understanding the IBC Tall Wood Code Provisions

In December 2018, the International Code Council announced that 14 code change proposals related to expanding the allowable heights and areas of mass timber buildings had been approved by its voting members. These new code provisions, which will be included as part of the 2021 International Building Code (IBC), create three new construction types and allow tall timber buildings up to 18 stories. This presentation will provide an overview of the new code provisions, including allowable heights and areas, fire-resistance ratings, allowances for exposing the timber structure and/or encapsulating with non-combustible materials, options for utilizing concealed spaces and more. Whether you’re a developer/owner, building designer or contractor, this session will provide the information you need to start pursuing innovative tall wood projects.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

University of Arkansas Mass Timber Residence Halls: Design and Construction Insights

At over 202,000 square feet, Stadium Drive at the University of Arkansas is the nation’s first large-scale mass timber residence hall project. Framed with cross-laminated timber (CLT) floor and roof panels and glued-laminated timber (glulam) columns and beams, the project creates a vibrant new destination with retail dining, classrooms, maker-spaces, performance spaces, communal spaces, administrative offices, and faculty housing, along with a mix of semi-suites and pods totaling 708 beds. Presented by the project manager, this webinar will provide insights gained from the design and construction of this project, including building official review and code approval, inter-disciplinary coordination, shop drawings, construction sequencing and field modifications. This session will equip attendees with the knowledge required to approach the design and construction administration phase of innovative CLT buildings.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Modular Construction: Tomorrow’s Multi-Family Buildings at Today’s Price

While construction methods have generally remained constant for decades, designers, developers and contractors continually look for ways to build faster, safer and better—for less. Modular construction has been touted as an opportunity to combat rising interest rates and construction prices through greater efficiency, address the lack of skilled labor, and reduce jobsite waste. However, some architects and engineers are hesitant to embrace the modular approach because they don’t want their designs to be compromised, and they don’t think it has the flexibility or functionality to execute certain project typologies. However, as modular design has become more common, it has also grown nimbler. With an emphasis on multi-family and commercial projects, this webinar will explore the design implications of offsite wood-frame construction for architects and engineers. Particular focus will be given to modular components, including trends, benefits and design and detailing techniques that help teams realize the full benefits afforded by these systems.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Fire and Sound Detailing for Mid-Rise Wood-Frame Buildings

Growing interest in mid-rise Type III and Type V projects has led to a focus on cost-effective and buildable detailing strategies that align with code requirements for fire and life safety, acoustical separation and structural performance. Presented by an architect who has designed many multi-family and mixed-use mid-rise projects, this webinar goes beyond code provisions and focuses on the “how-to” associated with designing and detailing these wood-frame buildings. Architectural design and detailing topics specific to fire and life safety and acoustics will be reviewed at length, including floor-to-wall details, shaft walls, fire walls, and the intersection of two rated assemblies in four- to six-story, Type III and Type V wood structures.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Noise and Vibration Control in Wood-Frame Multi-Family Buildings

Learn to avoid common comfort-related pitfalls in wood-frame multi-family projects. Presented by an acoustics and vibration expert, this webinar will cover practical information related to code requirements, acoustical barriers, and high-performing, acoustically-rated wall and floor assemblies. Recommendations to avoid common pitfalls such as flanking paths will be presented along with example projects featuring real-world acoustical issues and solutions. Vibration and associated noise issues related to mechanical equipment will also be addressed, with an emphasis on how to avoid them through proper isolation design.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Keeping it Under Wraps: Achieving Passive House with Affordable Multi-Family Designs

When many building owners, contractors and other design and construction professionals hear the term ‘passive house,’ they immediately think of increased construction costs. However, several examples exist to demonstrate that passive house wood-frame multi-family projects can be just as affordable as similar non-passive house projects. Drawing on experiences and insights gained from three multi-family passive house projects in cold climates, this presentation will highlight methods of reducing costs—both upfront and long term—that provide the budget containment necessary for the design of affordable housing.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Advanced Detailing Techniques for Building Enclosures

This presentation will provide an in-depth look at a variety of wood-frame building enclosure assemblies and details. Beginning with a review of building enclosure design fundamentals and considerations, it will then focus on best practices with references from technical guidelines and case studies. Finally, the critical detail interfaces between different enclosure assemblies (i.e., walls, roofs, balconies, windows) will be reviewed with a focus on continuity of critical barriers. Details and case studies will be presented for each.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Building Enclosure Design: Fundamentals, Components and Assemblies

Building enclosures are responsible for controlling heat flow, air flow, vapor flow and a number of other elements. Through a combination of building science fundamentals and current research, this presentation will explore design considerations associated with wood-frame building enclosures and the role of control layers. Discussion will focus on best practices for designing durable, energy-efficient enclosures using traditional light wood-frame construction.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Optimized Design, Efficient Construction: How One Company Successfully Constructed a Massive Timber Project

This case study presentation offers a rare opportunity to learn about mass timber from a company that built one of the largest cross-laminated timber (CLT) projects in the US—a five-story, 156,000-square-foot office building in Hillsboro, Oregon. Swinerton Builders, which undertook all aspects of construction in-house, will share information on procurement and erection not easily found through other sources. Insights will cover pre-construction activities, including design optimization, proper use of BIM to manage the many prefabricated elements inherent in a large mass timber project, and phasing techniques. Site logistics, quality management, field production, and erection details will also be discussed.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

UMass Design Building: A Firsthand Account from Design through Owner Occupancy

Completed in early 2017, the Design Building at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is the first of its kind in the U.S. At four stories and 87,500 sf, this mass timber project features a glued-laminated (glulam) timber column-and-beam frame, mass timber lateral force-resisting system, hybrid cross-laminated timber (CLT)/concrete floor system, and unconventional cantilevered forms. This presentation will highlight two aspects of the project: the design process will be discussed by the principal architect and the construction and occupancy phases will be reviewed by an associate professor who was close to the process and now works in the building. From code approval through occupancy, this session will address the process and collaboration required to see this groundbreaking structure to fruition in a steel-dominated construction industry.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Rocky Mountain Institute Innovation Center: Progressive Timber Office Design

When the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI), an entrepreneurial nonprofit think-and-do tank driving the efficient use of energy and resources, decided to build a new office building, wood was a natural choice. Completed in 2015, RMI’s new Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado was required to meet ambitious goals: utilize sustainable construction materials while providing a net-zero, adaptable, commercial office building with a 100-year design life in one of the country’s harshest climates. Both light-frame wood construction and mass timber were chosen for their ability to simplify and reduce structural systems, meet energy efficiency and natural daylight requirements, and utilize locally sourced materials. This case study presentation will examine wood’s role as both structure and finish in this 15,600-sf office building.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

New for DoD Designers: Structural Design of Mass Timber Exposed to Blast Loads

Facilities constructed for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) must often must be designed for blast loads in accordance with anti-terrorism requirements stipulated in UFC 4-010-01. As cross-laminated timber (CLT) and other mass timber solutions continue making inroads in federal construction projects, demand for a design methodology complete with response limits for CLT construction exposed to blast loads has emerged. This presentation will provide a primer on general blast design requirements for DoD facilities and introduce a blast design methodology for CLT construction based on two years of testing research.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Lateral Design Approaches for Mid-Rise and Tall Timber: CLT Diaphragms and Rocking Wall Systems

When it’s completed, the 12-story Framework project in Portland, Oregon is expected to be the tallest timber building in the U.S. A winner of the U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize Competition, it is also remarkable for its use of an innovative rocking timber wall system, designed to increase the building’s resilience and provide high seismic performance. This presentation will provide an overview of the structural design of this mass timber project, with particular focus on the lateral force-resisting system. Design and modeling approaches to the use of CLT diaphragms in a tall timber building in high seismic regions will be highlighted, as will design of the rocking wall system and the research and testing used to demonstrate its above-code performance.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Structural Design of Mass Timber Framing Systems

Mass timber structural framing systems have high strength-to-weight ratios, are dimensionally stable, and are quickly becoming systems of choice for sustainably-minded designers. This presentation will provide a detailed look at the structural design processes associated with a variety of mass timber products, including glulam, CLT, and NLT. Applications for the use of these products in gravity force-resisting systems under modern building codes will be discussed. Other technical topics will include use of mass timber panels as two-way spanning slabs, connection options and design considerations, and detailing and construction best practices.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Exposed Wood in Fire-Resistive Applications

For buildings, the fire resistance of structural elements is a code-stipulated requirement often dictated by the construction type chosen rather than building materials used. Wood structures are unique in that they can be unprotected while still providing a level of fire resistance. However, both designers and jurisdictions tend to be unfamiliar with this approach. This presentation will cover the use of a variety of exposed structural wood products (solid sawn lumber, nail-laminated timber, glue-laminated timber and cross laminated timber) in different fire-resistant applications for construction Types III, IV and V. Discussion will include implementation of char calculations, considerations for connections, and information on when calculations or fire tests are required for proving fire resistance in these scenarios. With a better understanding of the challenges and potential solutions, attendees will be able to confidently pursue exposed wood for their projects.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Shaft Wall Solutions for Wood-Frame Structures

It is fairly common for light wood-frame commercial and multi-family buildings to include another material for the shaft construction. However, many designers and contractors have come to realize that wood-frame shaft walls are a code-compliant means of reducing cost and shortening construction schedule. In this presentation, detailing for elevator, stair and mechanical shafts will be reviewed along with relevant code provisions. Discussion will focus on fire resistance-rated design parameters, but will also include other architectural and structural considerations related to shaft walls.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Code-Compliant Fire-Resistance Design for Wood Construction

Determining the proper code application for wood-frame fire assemblies can be challenging and is often further complicated with increases in a project’s size and scale. In a building environment where the ability to maximize height and area is key to cost effectiveness, designers must understand the gamut of fire protection considerations applicable to mid- and low-rise wood structures. This presentation will include code requirements, compliance options and nuances related to assembly selection for required fire resistance-rated floor/ceiling assemblies, exterior walls, fire barriers, fire partitions, and fire walls. Topics will include distinctions between fire-resistive elements for separation vs. class of construction.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Timber-Concrete Composite Floor Systems

Many commercial, mixed-use and multi-family buildings utilize long-span floor systems that allow for open and flexible interior floor plans. Competitive long-span floor systems made with mass timber-concrete composite panels are an opportunity to expand the use of wood framing in a variety of occupancy and building types, including high-rises. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill has been researching timber-concrete composite floor systems that can satisfy the structural, serviceability, acoustic and fire requirements of high-rise buildings and has recently completed a physical testing program with Oregon State University. This presentation will showcase the results, including the effect of shear connector type on composite action, two-way spanning behavior of composite timber panels, long-term behaviors, and full-scale verification of a typical long-span bay.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

More with Less: An Overview of the First CLT Hotel in the US

The availability of cross laminated timber (CLT) in the U.S. is causing some designers to rethink traditional construction practices—and one progressive development company is helping to lead that charge. For the recently completed Candlewood Suites Hotel on the Army Installation at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, Lendlease explored the use of CLT for improved construction efficiency, enhanced performance, and blast resistance. The four-story, 62,688-sf project utilized CLT for nearly all floor, roof and wall framing, making it the first mass timber hotel in the country. This presentation will review the economic, environmental and social benefits realized through the use of CLT on this project, and address CLT’s viability as a market changing technology. Lessons learned during the design and construction processes will be discussed, as will some of the perceived hurdles and associated solutions related to using CLT as a whole building system.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Aspen Art Museum: Design and Construction of the Wood Roof Structure

The Aspen Art Museum, designed by architect Shigeru Ban, includes a long-span three-dimensional wood space-frame roof. Ban’s charge was to create a wood space frame with spans of more than 50 feet and cantilevers of 14 feet, in a structural depth of 3 feet. The space frame was to have two planes of intersecting diagonal webs of curved members that undulated up and down to touch the planes of the top and bottom chords with no visible connectors. This case study presentation will describe the design and construction of the wood structure, including paths explored but not chosen for the final design.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Lateral Design Considerations for Mid-Rise Structures

This presentation will focus on important engineering considerations related to the lateral design of multi-story wood buildings. Implementation of a well-considered design requires an understanding of diaphragm and shear wall flexibility and their effects on the horizontal distribution of forces through the structure. In mid-rise/multi-family buildings, corridor-only shear walls are becoming popular as a way to eliminate exterior shear walls. The design issues this creates will be addressed, as will the unique load distribution and flexibility considerations associated with tall shear walls.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Rational Design Methods for Shear Walls with Openings

Just as structural engineers often need solutions that ‘do more with less,’ so do modern wood-frame buildings—and shear walls are no exception. With more openings and larger lateral forces, segmented shear wall approaches do not always produce the most efficient structural design. Through live calculation examples, this presentation will introduce and compare rational analysis methods for designing shear walls with openings.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Practical Design Methods for Diaphragms with Openings

It is common for the building code and related standards to require analysis and detailing for various aspects of design without providing guidance on approach. An example is how to address diaphragm openings that occur every day in wood-frame building design. When do openings require detailed analysis? What if an opening exists at one edge/end of the diaphragm? Through live calculation examples, this presentation will help engineers and structural designers determine when detailed analysis is necessary, introduce and compare two methods of analysis, and translate the analysis into practical detailing considerations.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Framework: A US Tall Wood Experience

Framework, a 12-story mixed-use project in Portland, Oregon, is scheduled to break ground in the first quarter of 2017 and will be the first all mass timber high-rise in the U.S. As a winner of the U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize Competition funded by the USDA and the Softwood Lumber Board, this project is intended to demonstrate that timber buildings of this scale are feasible. During this session, the project architect will share the Framework story, providing insights regarding the current design and how it evolved over time, system testing, jurisdictional approvals and construction planning. Discussion will include challenges and solutions, with an emphasis on issues related to exposed structure, lateral load resistance, and detailing for fire performance.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

TallWood House at Brock Commons

When completed in the spring of 2017, the 18-story TallWood House at Brock Commons will be the tallest contemporary mass wood building in the world. An exceptional example of the advantages of timber prefabrication, this project aspires to be the model for a future that includes extraordinarily ordinary mass wood buildings. This presentation will introduce the project, discuss the various design approaches considered and explain the process used to arrive at the final solution. While providing a focused discussion on the structural design and unique engineering challenges, the presenter will also provide an introduction to the fire/life safety approach, construction methods and project coordination.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

The First Cross Laminated Timber School in the US: A Builders Perspective

The Pendleton County School District in West Virginia is the first in the United States to build a new school in cross laminated timber. With panels for the 40,000-square-foot facility installed in less than three months by a crew of five carpenters and a crane operator, CLT represents a new world of opportunity for the growing district. In this presentation, the CLT erector for the project will discuss the advantages and challenges of using this new material in the context of structure, building envelope and exposed wood aesthetic. He’ll also share insights into the planning process, equipment and labor, and how CLT construction differs from typical methods.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Fire Retardant-Treated Wood: The Basics

For some applications—such as exterior walls in Type III Construction—building codes allow the use of wood providing it is fire retardant-treated (FRT). This presentation offers an overview of FRT wood in the United States, including specific references under the International Building Code, available products and examples of typical use. This session will explore how treatments are impregnated into the wood, how some FR Treatments offer preservative protection and the testing required to confirm fire retardant capabilities. Topics will also include understanding the labels on FRT wood products for interior and exterior uses, and occupant safety.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

High-Performance Wood Structures: An Example of Increased Efficiency in Multi-Family Construction

For this case study presentation, The Distillery’s 28-unit Phase 1 building—a six-story, wood-frame-over-podium Passive House project under construction in South Boston—will be used to highlight design and construction principles that can radically reduce energy consumption. Applicable to nearly all building types, the discussion will highlight how a low-load building approach can be applied both to new construction and retrofits. Emphasis will be placed on the deepening knowledge and evolving strategies that helped produce a highly-efficient, cost-effective building that will be affordable to operate, comfortable and healthy for occupants, and highly resilient. Details, testing data and lessons learned will be shared, with a special focus on the thermal envelope, continuous air barrier implementation, and efficient ventilation systems. Wood’s use as structural material will be discussed, as will its role in providing a cost-effective building approach that allowed this project to come to fruition and afforded implementation of further sustainability features.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Solid Wood: New Trends in Mass Timber Architecture, Technology and Design

Through the rise of mass timber, one of the world’s oldest building materials has been reimagined as a sustainable alternative to concrete and steel. Innovations in solid wood building systems, which include large engineered wood members such as glue-laminated timber (GLT), laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and cross-laminated timber (CLT), have created new opportunities for wood, whether that means going taller, spanning farther, or building faster. Driven by wood’s light environmental footprint, large-scale wood buildings around the world are helping to spur building code changes, improve wood-based economies and demonstrate the untapped potential of this versatile material. This presentation will provide insight into these new, exciting architectural developments through detailed case studies that will expand your perception of wood’s possibilities.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Structural CLT Floor and Roof Design

This presentation is intended for designers of building systems seeking to familiarize themselves with the category of products known as mass timber, and specifically cross laminated timber (CLT). Topics will include manufacturing and product performance standards, structural design standards, and recognition of CLT in the International Building Code. Specific attention will be given to the design of CLT in horizontal applications—i.e., as panels of floor and roof systems—and discussion will include how to address important serviceability requirements related to deflection and floor vibration design. Example projects and details will be presented to highlight possible applications of CLT in building structures.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Heights & Areas: Using Software to Ease Building Code Analysis

This session will focus on the Check Height and Area software that reviews and analyzes building height and area compliance with the 2012 International Building Code (IBC), for buildings up to six stories, with up to four occupancy groups at each level. This user-friendly application is created for design professionals and building officials to ease building code analysis. Step-by-step instructions will be provided and common issues related to height and area limitations will be illustrated with examples of actual mixed occupancy group, multi-story buildings.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

EPDs and HPDs Opportunities within LEED v4 and Green Globes

User-friendly product transparency and life cycle assessment tools facilitate exploration of design alternatives and lead to environmentally better buildings, while freeing design and engineering teams from adherence to long lists of prescriptive provisions. Two of these tools, Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) and Health Product Declarations (HPDs), are being used to improve environmental impacts and occupant environment. This presentation will provide an overview of these tools, including what goes into their development, what they reveal, and how to use them effectively. Opportunities for applying EPDs, HPDs and LCA provisions within LEED v. 4, Green Globes and other green building standards will also be explored.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Mass Timber Building Systems: Understanding the Options

Mass timber represents a rapidly advancing technology that can be utilized as an alternative to steel and concrete to frame a variety of mid- and high-rise building types. This presentation provides an overview of available mass timber systems, with an emphasis on their advantages and unique design considerations. Topics will include connections and fasteners, which differ from those used in light-frame wood construction, including available options and code requirements. Practical design considerations with regard to project location, climate, material sourcing, weather and fire protection, as well as detailing for dimensional variability, will also be reviewed. Cost estimating will be discussed, as successful mass timber projects require a complete understanding of both the system itself and impact on trades.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

The Evolution of Fire Life Safety in Building Codes

Over the last 80 years, prescriptive height and area limitations have remained relatively unchanged in North American building codes while technological advances and fire service capabilities have improved considerably. Through an examination of historical code development and identification of the risk factors on which codes are based, we can set the stage for a re-examination of public perception with regard to combustible construction. This presentation will cover techniques for mitigating fire damage and reducing fire spread while describing how an understanding of code intent can be used to argue equivalent fire performance when wood solutions lie outside typical code-approved applications.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Forests & Forest Products

This presentation will answer many questions about forests and forest products, such as: Where do our trees and forests grow? How have forests changed over time? What is the relationship between people and forests – now and in the past? How are forests managed – and are they being managed responsibly? Are our forests and forest products sustainable? Why is wood an environmentally-friendly choice?

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

The Application of Traditional and Modern Heavy Timber Connections

The selection of heavy timber connections can be challenging, even for designers experienced with these types of building projects. This presentation will provide a thorough discussion of traditional and modern heavy timber connectors and connections, including their design and application. Topics will include some of the connection types and methods used to repair or reinforce existing heavy timber members, such as wooden pegs, wooden wedges, and fully-threaded screws. Discussion will also include a review of European connectors and their selection for specific design applications including cross laminated timber.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Building as Teacher: Designing with Nature

Built and opened to students in 2012, Burr and Burton Academy’s Mountain Campus is an innovative model for place-based environmental education. From campus and building design and construction to curriculum design, topics will include concepts that helped the campus achieve “net zero” targets, biophilic wood-based design inspirations, student experiences monitoring the buildings’ energy performance, living in and caring for the space, and the ripple effects of student experiences during the first two years of operation.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Offset Shear Wall Design

The complexities of modern day architectural design often necessitate irregular structural layouts with multiple offset roof and floor diaphragms, and walls. Although codes and standards recognize and address these situations, limited commentary and/or examples have been provided that clearly show how these irregularities can be handled. This session will help designers better understand how to analyze offset walls, as well as their implications to the structural design. A continuation of the WoodWorks Offset Diaphragms Design webinar, it focuses on how to conduct a preliminary breakdown of a complex diaphragm to better understand the distribution of forces and assure that complete load paths are being established. Examples will be provided illustrating how to analyze in-plane and out-of-plane offset shear walls that offset diaphragms typically create.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

A 21st Century Iconic Glulam Structure: Cathedral of Christ the Light

Architecturally stunning, the Cathedral of Christ the Light features a space-frame structure comprised of a glulam and steel-rod skeleton veiled with a glass skin. Twenty-six, 110-foot glulam Douglas-fir ribs curve to the roof to form the framework for the sanctuary superstructure, while 724 closely spaced glulam “louver” members interconnect and provide lateral bracing for inner ribs. Through the use of advanced seismic techniques, including base isolation, the structure has been designed to withstand a 1,000-year earthquake. This presentation examines the Cathedral’s structural design, specification, fabrication and erection, highlighting the technologies, connections and engineering that made this project one of the most iconic timber structures of the 21st century.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Exploring Efficient Design for a Mass Timber Office: The Nail Laminated Timber Solution

The architectural and environmental success of The Bullitt Center in Seattle has made heavy timber office buildings a topic of great interest within the design community. Now, with ground broken on a new 7-story example in Minneapolis, cost-effectiveness can be added to the potential benefits achieved with a mass timber structural solution. Presented by the timber specialists responsible for such iconic structures as the Richmond Olympic Oval, this presentation explores the aesthetic potential and efficiency of nail laminated timber systems, while touching on relevant engineering, manufacturing and erection techniques used in other timber projects. Examples demonstrate opportunities for prefabrication and sophisticated erection techniques, while emphasizing the importance of efficient structural engineering, product choice, connections and fasteners to creating economical timber structures.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Getting to Yes: Code Alternate Materials and Means and Permit Streamlining

This session will cover principles and strategy for effective navigation of the building permit process when materials or designs don’t comfortably fit with conventional code application, as well as the use of permit streamlining for more effective and efficient processing. Alternate Materials and Means Requests (AMMR) can be used for various reasons including: use of innovative products and systems, new design concepts, complex geometries, code conundrums, political problem solving and the resolution of interpretation differences. Successful project examples will be used to demonstrate how to approach the AMMR process and demystify the concept of an alternate design. In addition, the landscape of permit streamlining concepts will be outlined, with a focus on streamlining approaches that can engage design professionals on the ‘public’ side of the counter in a project’s ultimate success.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Preservative-Treated Wood: Use and Specification

In applications where wood may be exposed to moisture, insects or fungal organisms, preservative-treated wood can help ensure a building’s durability. In this presentation, participants will learn about the manufacturing process for pressure-treated wood, available products and their differences, and how preserved wood is used in construction. Topics will include types of preservative treatments and the required levels of retention, as dictated by the end-use application, desired service life and exposure conditions. AWPA Use Category standards and ICC-ES Report Evaluations will be reviewed, and current issues concerning treated wood in residential and commercial construction be discussed. Participants will also receive free access to the Treated Lumber smartphone app.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Detailing for Wood Shrinkage

For condominiums, apartments, hotels and dormitories, multi-story wood construction is viewed by many as a way to achieve higher density at lower cost, while reducing the project’s carbon footprint. One of the challenges, in designing these taller buildings, is how to calculate and address wood shrinkage, which occurs as the wood dries from its ‘green’ state to its in-service equilibrium state. This session will examine shrinkage associated with wall and floor design, and demonstrate how to minimize effects of both shrinkage and differential movement with proper detailing. The discussion will include solutions to shrinkage induced construction issues such as drywall cracking, window frame wracking, and compromised plumbing lines.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Prefabrication: Discoveries in Off-Site Construction Techniques

Off-site construction techniques, including both light-frame and solid wood solutions, are continually evolving—with prefabrication at the forefront of the trend. Popular in countries such as Sweden, Germany, Scotland and Canada, these techniques are also gaining interest in the U.S., where designers, contractors and owners in the traditional construction sector are seeking to understand the options available to them. In this presentation, different types of prefabrication will be discussed, along with key considerations—such as site, cost and schedule to determine which option, if any, is right for a project. Case study examples will be used to illustrate key principles of practice, benefits of prefabrication and current challenges.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Lumber Specifications in a Changing Market

Writing lumber specifications, which meet structural and esthetic design requirements can be challenging under the best market conditions. New market realities and changing client priorities have left many designers and suppliers rethinking traditional approaches to wood design specifications. This presentation will cover relevant industry standards and specification issues, which can arise with material substitutions. Product availability at both the local and national level and its impact on design considerations will be discussed in depth.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Durable Design: Lessons from Historic Wood Structures

While modern construction techniques are helping designers achieve increasing levels of building performance, durability is one objective that can benefit from lessons of the past. This presentation is based on an independent research project that examined the durability of historic wood buildings in Rome in the context of their construction details. Undertaken by the speaker, Matthew Bronski, over ten months, the project included hands-on study of about two dozen historic buildings ranging in period from the first century B.C. to the early 1900s. Through project examples, Bronski will offer a compelling diagnosis of durability successes and failures, while sharing a series of lessons and principles that can be used to design more durable enclosures.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Survey of International Tall Wood Buildings

Over the past several years, a number of tall wood projects have been completed around the world, demonstrating the successful application of mass timber technologies. To assist North American building designers interested in the potential of these technologies, architecture firm Perkins+Will recently undertook a survey of 10 completed projects in several countries. Through interviews and site visits, the goal was learn from early adopters and present common lessons based on the experiences of four key stakeholder groups: the developer/owner, design team, authorities having jurisdiction and construction team. This seminar will present the results of that survey, focusing on the development, design, approval and construction process, as well as issues related to insurance, financing and building performance.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Understanding the Design Requirements for 5-Story Wood-Framed Mid-Rise Construction

This course will try to unravel the mystery of how to design 5-story wood frame residential buildings and 6-story mixed-use projects. It will discuss the Building Code requirements, along with its height and area limitations. The course will also discuss some of the technical challenges of building tall wood frame buildings, including designing for wind and seismic forces; how to control shrinkage; and enhanced fire protection requirements.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Bullitt Center: Meeting the Living Building Challenge

The Bullitt Center, a six-story heavy timber building recently completed in Seattle, is predicted to be the world’s most energy-efficient commercial building. It has been designed to last 250 years and to achieve the highest benchmark of building sustainability—Living Building Challenge™ (LBC) certification. A performance-based certification program, the LBC requires buildings to be evaluated after one year of occupancy prior to certification, against criteria that include 100% of energy demands met with on-site renewable energy generation and 100% of water needs met by on-site rainwater collection. In this presentation, Project Architect Brian Court will give a short overview of the LBC, discuss the design strategies for the Bullitt Center, and highlight structural and environmental virtues of the heavy timber structural system such as renewability, contribution to energy efficiency, and light carbon footprint.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Offset Diaphragm Design

Lateral force resisting systems in today’s structures are more complex than they were several decades ago, incorporating multiple horizontal and vertical offsets in the diaphragms, multiple irregularities and fewer lateral resisting elements. This presentation will provide a brief review of the method used to analyze these complex structures.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Use of Laser Scanning Technology to Obtain As-Built Records for Historic Covered Bridges

This webinar will provide an overview of the use of three-dimensional, (3D) high definition laser scanning technology to scan existing historic covered bridges for purpose of obtaining as-built records for historic documentation. It will provide key digital documentation on six covered bridges in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa that were scanned using portable scanning equipment. Information will be presented on the scanning technology, data processing and cost saving implications of this technology, along with its potential as part of a comprehensive inspection protocol for historic covered bridges.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Restoring Structural Integrity of Covered Bridge Members

Covered bridge members are sometimes compromised by decay, insect attack, or a range of non-biologic factors. Although information is available on methods of inspecting covered bridges, few resources are available to guide decisions once a problem is detected. Assuming the cause of degradation is addressed, a decision still must be made as to whether the member can continue to function without corrective action, or how it can be repaired, reinforced or replaced while retaining the maximum amount of historic fabric. This webinar will include an overview of the role of covered bridge assessment and engineering analysis prior to considering repair options, means of implementing effective repairs while retaining historic character, and the practicality and long-term durability of repair options.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

All-Wood and Hybrid Panelized Roof Systems: Cost-Effective Roof Solutions

Although panelized roof systems are especially popular in industrial building applications on the west coast, they can be used to reduce building costs in retail, commercial and office applications all over the US. Learn why panelized roof systems are so cost-effective and how they are efficiently designed and installed. Topics will include solutions for structural loading, fire protection, durability, energy efficiency and constructability in addition to project examples.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Building Enclosure Design and Moisture Performance

Moisture management and durability are key elements of building envelope design but are often not well understood. This presentation will help design and building professionals understand how the building envelope responds to environmental conditions, with emphasis on heat, air, and moisture control. The talk will highlight wood-moisture relations, focusing on key physical properties and concepts. Strategies will be presented for evaluating building envelope design in terms of performance strengths and vulnerabilities, with examples from wood-frame construction as well as cross-laminated timber construction.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Cost Effective, High Performance: Meeting the Challenges of Mixed-Use Podium Design

Framed within the twin objectives of high performance and low cost, this presentation will focus on International Building Code (IBC) provisions and structural challenges associated with designing a podium structure. Opportunities to utilize advanced framing and cross laminated timber (CLT) will also be discussed.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Innovation in Wood Construction: A Comparison of Two Projects

The benefits of wood are becoming increasingly relevant in the context of global warming and non-renewable resource depletion, and its use can have a large impact on a project’s carbon footprint through both carbon sequestration and avoided greenhouse gas emissions. This presentation will focus on the use of wood in two innovative Perkins+Will projects, both located at the University of British Columbia: the Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) and the Earth Sciences Building (ESB).

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Significant Changes in the IBC, NDS and SDPWS

This course will provide a brief overview of significant building code and standard changes related to non-residential and multi-family wood building design and will give context to current allowances as well as future code pursuits. Topics will include recent International Code Council (ICC) and American Wood Council efforts related to code advancement, and the latest changes to the International Building Code (IBC), National Design Specification (NDS) for Wood Construction and Special Design Provisions for Wind and Seismic (SDPWS).

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Healthy Buildings: The Case for Visual Wood

Recent studies, along with evidence emerging from Europe and Asia, suggest that the use of wood indoors lowers stress reactivity of the sympathetic nervous system—which is associated with lower blood pressure, lower heart-rate, lower psychological stress, lower susceptibility to illness, and a better ability to focus attention. This is relevant both in the context of evidence-based design, which studies the effects of building design on occupants (among other things), and biopholic design, which considers the general affinity humans have for nature and addresses it through design elements and materials. This presentation will provide an overview of the evidence and mechanisms through which wood can affect human health, and its increasing use in educational, office and other environments.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Non-Structural Provisions for Multi-Story Wood Framed Buildings

This presentation highlights guidelines for navigating the maze of non-structural provisions in the current building code governing multi-story wood-frame buildings. Topics will include the appropriate path for a code study, whether it’s a multi-residential, commercial or mixed-use all-wood building, a Type I podium building utilizing the special provisions of section 510.2 or a five/six-story residential building of Type IIIA construction.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Guide for In-Place Preservative Treatment

This seminar covers the selection and application of in-place preservative treatments to historic and modern timber bridges. In-place treatment options will be described, with an emphasis on how their characteristics make them more or less suitable for a range of bridge applications. Examples of approaches to applying treatments in specific scenarios will be presented along with research findings on their efficacy. Topics will also include situations where decay and insect attack is most likely to occur, and where in-place treatments are most likely to provide benefit, as well as preservative treatment, safety, handling and regulatory considerations.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Corrosion of Metals in Contact with Wood

It is no surprise that, when metal fasteners or connections are exposed to moisture, they can be susceptible to corrosion. However, many people overlook the effects of moisture on corrosion of metal fasteners when designing for the performance of timber bridges. This webinar summarizes research on the corrosion of metals in wood, explains why metals corrode and gives practical design recommendations to engineers and architects designing wood bridges.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Security of Historic Covered Bridges

Quintessentially American, covered bridges were once a familiar sight from coast-to-coast. However, due to various factors that include neglect, arson, vandalism and natural disasters, there are currently less than 900 covered bridges in existence today. Given their unique place in history, it is essential that these remaining bridges be protected and preserved for future generations. One way to provide the necessary security is to use remote monitoring and other security systems that protect them from trespassers. This webinar will introduce the Covered Bridge Security Manual and is intended to assist covered bridge owners in selecting systems that offer protection with the option of adding active alerting of proper authorities for the purpose of heightened security.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Field Performance of Timber Highway Bridges: A National Study

This webinar will provide an overview of the recently completed National Timber Bridge Inspection Study jointly administered by the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The overall aim of this first-of-its-kind effort was to estimate the service life of timber highway bridges and their comparative durability within the various climate zones within the U.S. A description of timber bridge superstructure types and locations as well as the field inspection protocol employed by all inspectors is also provided. Inspection results will be presented for the 132 bridges included, by climate zone and by superstructure type, and solutions to common deterioration issues will be highlighted.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Designing Wood-frame Schools in the Bethel School District

This presentation will investigate the use of wood framing in Washington State’s Bethel School District, with an emphasis on energy efficiency, building costs and benefits to the local community. It will be delivered by the District’s Director of Construction & Planning, who was instrumental in the development of green building standards for public schools and under whose leadership the District has constructed 10 schools utilizing Washington State Sustainable Protocols.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Understanding your Environment: Forests, Trees and Responsible Wood Products

This presentation addresses key questions about forests, forestry and wood products. What makes a forest ecosystem? What is responsible forest management? What kind of forests do we have in North America and what are the trends? This presentation helps connect what happens in our forests to the use of responsible wood products and green building programs.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Treated Wood Piling – The Support You Need!

This webinar will provide valuable information concerning the proper specification and use of treated-wood piling. Information will be presented on typical foundation applications employing timber piling, strengths of timber piling, the ASTM Standards controlling the properties of timber piling, the preservatives used to provide protection to timber piling, the National Standards controlling the preservative treatment of timber piling, and the environmental considerations in the use of treated-wood piling.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Fire-resistive Design of Exposed Timber Structures

This presentation focuses on the two distinct construction types that allow designers to incorporate the beauty of exposed timber with a fire-resistive framing system—heavy timber and one-hour fire-resistive construction. Both are approved by the International Building Code and yet there is a great deal of confusion regarding these systems within the design community. Topics include an overview of heavy timber construction and two code-recognized methods of achieving one-hour fire-resistive rating construction in specific building types, as well as permitted areas. Examples of how to detail the framing system to achieve the building types are also provided.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

2012 National Design Specification for Wood Construction

The National Design Specification (NDS®) for Wood Construction is the dual format Allowable Stress Design (ASD) and Load Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) document referenced in U.S. building codes and used to design wood structures worldwide. In this seminar, participants learn how to apply ASD and LRFD provisions to wood construction, and their similarities/differences with respect to design values and behavioral equations.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Calculation of Wood-frame Diaphragm Deflection per the 2008 Special Design Provisions for Wind and Seismic

Calculation of wood-frame diaphragm deflection should account for bending and shear deflections, fastener deformation, chord splice slip, and other contributing sources of deflections. The American Wood Council’s 2008 Special Design Provisions for Wind and Seismic (SDPWS) incorporates both a 3-term and 4-term deflection equation that accounts for these variables. This webinar will provide an overview and comparison of the 3-term and 4-term deflection equations. Additionally, an example showing calculation of mid-span deflection of a blocked wood structural panel diaphragm will be presented.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Connection Solutions for Wood Framed Structures

One of the biggest “eye openers” for those new to the design of non-residential wood buildings is that designing and detailing the connections is not as complex as imagined. This seminar features an overview of common fastener types and the wood connection philosophies relevant to each. Topics include techniques for designing efficient, durable and structurally safe connections, minimizing environmental effects on wood connections, simple design examples and available resources.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Five-story Wood-frame Structure over Concrete Podium Slab

This presentation will provide an overview of the design and construction of a five-story wood-framed structure over a concrete podium slab. Topics will include Type III construction, fire-retardant-treated wood, design of the horizontal and vertical lateral systems, two-stage lateral design for seismic, continuous tie-down systems, shear wall deflections and shrinkage considerations. Discussion will highlight topics included in the new WoodWorks Design Example, Five-story Wood-Frame Structure over Podium Slab.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Adventures in Engineering – Designing the Iconic Metropol Parasol

This presentation focuses on the design of the iconic Metropol Parasol. From the first sketches to the turn of the last screw, the design team—architects, structural engineers and wood specialists —found itself on an expedition in new technological and architectural territory. This could only be managed with a great deal of knowledge, experience, and creativity, as well as the courage to come up with new, cutting-edge solutions. Likewise for the innovative ideas that are necessary for the realization of a design that cannot and does not want to differentiate between architecture and structure.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Designing the Worlds Tallest Mixed-Use Building

This session will focus on the design and construction of the nine-story Stadthaus building in London (UK), which is the world’s tallest mixed-use wood structure. It will emphasize the unique features that allowed nine stories to be erected in nine weeks, shortening the entire construction schedule by 23 weeks while satisfying safety and other building code requirements. Built in cross laminated timber (CLT), the Stadthaus includes 29 apartments and a residents’ office, and is a modern and engaging counterpart to the neighborhood’s ground-hugging slab blocks built in the 1950s and ’60s.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

LCT ONE: Case Study of an Eight Story Wood Office Building

This presentation will describe the Life Cycle Tower ONE (LCT ONE), an eight-story wood office building recently built in Austria. LCT ONE was the culmination of a research and development project that resulted in a system for building timber high-rises up to 30 stories. It is a solution that addresses climate change in the design and construction industry, beginning with the choice of a natural, renewable resource to replace steel, concrete and other fossil fuel intensive materials. Topics will include the motivation, research and product development that preceded the construction of LCT ONE, as well as production of the floor and wall components and erection of the building envelope in just eight days.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Testing and Product Evaluation of Products for Wood‐framed Construction

Products that are not covered by the code are used in many if not all buildings. While the code permits a single engineer to review and submit to a building official and a single building official to review and approve a product not covered by the code, many feel a more robust process is needed to ensure that these products meet the code intent. Also, many code or evaluation reports are used not just for one project, but for multitudes of projects in numerous locations. Test setups can affect the performance and load rating of products. Several private entities have been created over the years to assist the industry by developing public and transparent processes to develop test requirements, load rating requirements, design and detailing requirements, and ongoing quality compliance as well as product evaluation methodologies. This webinar will discuss various acceptance criteria and testing methods used for products used in wood construction, such as ASTM D7147 and ICC-ES AC155 to further advance the knowledge of these test methods and processes for those in the wood construction industry.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

First Commercial Project Opens Doors for CLT in US

This case study presentation will showcase the first commercial building in the US constructed with cross laminated timber (CLT)—The Long Hall in Whitefish, Montana. Completed in 2011, this two-story infill project epitomizes many of the benefits of CLT, including speed of installation (the building took just five days to erect), the environmental and aesthetic benefits of wood, and energy efficiency. Project engineer Darryl Byle will discuss the design and construction process, as well as the building code challenges associated with being among the first in North America to use CLT and how they were addressed. He will also share the results of a cost analysis that compared CLT to concrete masonry units.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Wood Podium Mixed-use Design: Lessons from an Architectural Case Study

Mixed use buildings often combine parking and retail uses on the ground level with residential uses above. Wood construction can help maximize value to the community, the environment and the development team. This presentation discusses opportunities and challenges for wood podium design with reference to a recently completed mixed use wood podium building. Topics include code analysis, green/sustainable benefits, dimensional drivers, structural constraints, and design for management of wood for the long term.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Full-scale Shear Wall Tests for Forced Transfer around Openings

A joint research project of APA, the University of British Columbia (UBC), and the USDA Forest Products Laboratory was initiated in 2009 to examine the variations of walls with code-allowable openings. This study examines the internal forces generated during these tests and evaluates the effects of opening size, full-height pier size, and different construction techniques by using the segmented method, perforated shear wall method and force transfer around openings method. Full-scale wall tests and analytical modeling were performed, and the research results obtained will be used to support design methodologies in estimating the forces around the openings. This presentation shares test results from the (8 feet x 12 feet) full-scale wall configurations, which will be used in conjunction with the analytical results from a computer model developed by UBC to develop rational design methodologies for adoption in US design codes and standards.

 Recorded Seminar Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Basic Connector Training 101

This course covers the early history of metal connector joinery, product development and applications. Topics discussed will include the code evaluation process and evaluation reports, methods of testing and calculating the load carrying capacities for gravity loads, and safety factors considered when presenting allowable loads for the designer’s consideration. Some of the IRC connector call outs will also be discussed from a prescriptive perspective.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Carbon Implications of Construction Material Selection

Carbon emissions have come to the forefront of public discourse and increasingly, of public policy. This presentation will focus on the worthwhile objective of maximizing carbon storage and minimizing carbon dioxide emissions associated with the design and construction of buildings. The carbon implications of building material selection will be examined, using examples of real world projects and material comparisons to show how using wood can reduce a building’s carbon footprint. Other topics will include tools for assessing carbon liberation, carbon equivalency, fossil vs. atmospheric carbon, CO2 sequestration, and implications of potential cap and trade legislation and the Kyoto process for materials selection and building design.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered

Building Height and Area Compliance with the 2012 International Building Code

This webinar is intended for design professionals who want to better understand how to successfully design multi-story wood buildings in compliance with the 2012 International Building Code (IBC). Focusing on allowable building height and area, it covers Chapter 5 of the IBC with examples comparing buildings that are different in terms of their occupancy groups, construction types (Type III, IV and V) and design elements (e.g. yard vs. no yard, mezzanine, etc.). In particular the Code sections that are commonly misinterpreted or overlooked are discussed. Also, the webinar presents the “Check Height and Area” software application that reviews and analyses building height and area in compliance with the IBC for buildings up to six stories, with up to four occupancy groups at each level. This user-friendly application is created to ease building code analysis. Step-by-step instructions are provided and common issues related to height and area limitations will be illustrated with examples of actual mixed occupancy group, multi-story buildings.

Recorded Seminar (Vimeo)Presentation Slide CE Credit not offered